Why Add Edible Flowers to Your Salads?

edible flowers on salad

So a few weeks ago, I  talked about broccoli being an edible flower, and that there are many others.  I know, I know, I was surprised by the idea too, but in fact, there are many edible flowers such as Gladiolus, Fuschia, Impatien, Pansies and Sunflowers to name a few. To see a longer list of edible flowers, click here.

Edible flowers add color, flavor and aroma to salads.  The salad pictured above uses Nasturtium and Cilantro blossoms. Nasturtium has a great orange color and a black pepper taste. The dainty white Cilantro blossoms taste like cilantro leaves and look kind of like the flower: Gypsophilia AKA: “Baby’s Breath.”

It’s a little uncommon in America to find flowers on your food, but other cultures have used them for many years in cooking and why not? Be mindful of allergies and such and keep to the list of known safe-to-eat flowers, but have some fun with artful and tasty flowers in your salads.

 

 

Raw Vegan Sushi With A Side of Cauliflower “Rice”

raw veggie sushiI just did not want another salad today. :-D My Asian heritage and and abundance of vegetables led me to this:

Raw Veggie Sushi With A Side of Cauliflower “Rice”

Gluten free, Dairy Free, Grain Free and Raw Vegan

Recipe:

- Gather up your favorite raw veggies: carrots, cauliflower, cucumbers, asparagus, peppers, scallions, spinach, etc. You name it.

- You will also need:

  • Nori Sheets
  • Wasabi Paste
  • Gluten Free Tamari (soy sauce)
  • Pickled Ginger

1. Rinse your veggies well in cold water then julienne them into thin strips about 3″ long, as narrow as you can get them.  (If you need help with julienne, check out this video) Put a couple crowns of cauliflower into the food processor and pulse until it looks like rice. (Careful not to over pulse.)

2. Put a tablespoon of wasabi powder in a small bowl. Add a few drops of water and mash it around with a  spoon. Add a few more drops of water and mash again, until you get a thick, play-doh consistency. Then mash some more. (The more you mash, the hotter it gets…)

3. cut the nori sheets into strips 2″ wide and 8 or 9″ long. Put a few tablespoons of water in a small bowl and keep nearby.

rolling sushi

Rolling Sushi

4. Lay a strip of nori on a wooden cutting board or other smooth flat surface, lengthwise away from you and place a few pieces of each veggie in the sheet about 2″ from the closest end.  Let some veggie pieces stick out further than others for better presentation. Dip your finger in the water bowl and wet the far end of the nori sheet, all the way from the top, down to the veggies.

5. Carefully roll the nori away from you, while pulling the veggies toward you, trying to keep the roll as tight as you can without tearing the nori.

6. Press the “riced” cauliflower into a small bowl and quickly put it upside down on your serving board to make the mound.

7. Serve on a sushi board with a small bowl of tamari, the wasabi paste and ginger.

Tanoshimi kudasai!

Broccoli Bouquet – Beauty and Nutrition

Picture 144We used to take our food supply for granted, picking it from a waste-high case in a grocery aisle, giving little thought to where it came from, who grew it and what it took to do that. It wasn’t until we started harvesting our own broccoli that I realized it is actually an edible flower. In fact, there are many edible flowers; nasturtium, bachelor’s buttons, dandelions, clovers, chives, lavender to name a few. To see a longer list, click here.

 

I don’t know if I’d put this broccoli in a vase on the table, but it sure is pretty to look at as I pick it for an afternoon meal.

garden in morning

Aside from the nutritional benefits of freshly grown organic vegetables, it does something for the soul to walk around in the garden and see the plants a little bigger than the day before, reaching for the sun, so hopeful and full of life.

Whatever is going on today for you, I suspect it will be a little better if you stop to pick some flowers, maybe even eat them once you’re done enjoying looking at them and enjoying their fragrance a while!

Celery contains antioxidants, vitamins, anti-inflammatory support

This is our first celery grown here at Mercy Hill Farm. We’re very excited. Here’s why: Celery contains antioxidants, vitamins, anti-inflammatory support unparalleled by other edible plants, but only if it’s fresh and organically grown.

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Find out more about how to buy, store and consume this amazing vegetable here: The World’s Healthiest Foods

Tomato Power

Tomato Plants

 

06/27/14 – These beauties are Brandywine heirloom variety plants, about 8 weeks old and loving these warm nights we’ve been having lately. The distinctive leaves are a lot like a potato plant. Brandywines are a large tomato, some as large a 1 1/2 lbs each. Great slicing tomato for sandwiches, or if you need an organic doorstop.

Give them another 5 or 6 weeks and we should have some on the farm table for sale. Go tomato power!

Fresh Squeezed Eggs

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Don’t forget the farm fresh eggs! It’s a great way to start the day. This is a chive omelet getting ready to power a whole lot of mowing, digging, planting and whatnot around the farm. Yes, those purple thingies are the chive flower buds. Mmm.. Buds. :-D

Tomato seedlings ready to stretch their legs

Tomato Plants

 

We have four varieties of tomatoes that can’t wait to go in the ground. Unfortunately, they have a few more days of waiting for the last frost danger to pass.

The four varieties this year are:

Estiva – Medium early red fruits

Sungold – Sweet golden cherry variety

Granadero – Plum-type sauce variety

Brandywine – Large, gnarly-looking beefsteak-shaped heirloom variety

So around mid to late July, look for these beauties at our farm stand, while supplies last. :-D

Garlic Plants

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Springtime here on the farm, not a lot of things growing in the garden yet. We’ve started tomatoes, peppers and other earlies inside of course, but outside, it’s mostly about the garlic, which gets planted in fall, stays warm under a bed of straw all winter, but look at it now!

Springtime Planting Begins

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We’re a wee bit anxious to see green again. How about you?
Today we’re starting our longest season crops indoors; things like bell peppers, jalapeños, bunching onions, broccoli, oregano and sage.

If we can’t have green outside, we’re going to at least have some inside. Looking forward to offering these and many more at our farmstand this summer.

Think green!

Don’t Forget The Farm Fresh Eggs

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I know. Winter doesn’t seem to want to end, but the hens don’t care. We have lots of farm fresh eggs for sale. So pit on yer hip boots and come on over! $ 250 a dozen.

Don & Karen Perkins – Local Foodie Farmers in the Lakes Region of New Hampshire